Politics and Personal Injury Law

The big day, election day, approaches. The polls, pundits, predictions and the regular circus and celebration of this election cycle have been a part of our national landscape for longer than perhaps any other cycle, at least in recent memory. What will we ever talk about around the water cooler after it’s all over? Which name will remain on our lips for at least the next four years, and which will fade into presidential trivia: Obama or McCain?

As the highest officer in the executive branch, the president is, in some ways, the law of the land or at least one of the three critical points defining it (along with the legislative and judicial branches). It follows, then, that it is not so uncommon for politicians to have legal backgrounds. Several of this year’s candidates, as well as pivotal political figures of recent memory have been trained, licensed attorneys.

This is by no means a recent phenomenon. Abraham Lincoln is a prime example. He practiced law for nearly 25 years in Illinois courts before rising to the highest office in the land. That so many of those in public office are trained, licensed attorneys only makes sense. Law is the vehicle through which the ideals, promises, and dreams expressed by past and present politicians (and their constituents) will manifest into our lives. “The law,” so often referenced in the abstract, is an invisible structure within which we live our lives: it sets expectations, guides and protects, and occasionally baffles and frustrates. Politicians serve the population as experts in law and democracy, representatives of the opinions of the individuals they represent.

Yet, for many of us, the entrance of a legal issue into our own lives leaves us frozen, paralyzed, indecisive. We are in a fender-bender and discover that the other driver is uninsured. Going for a walk, an unleashed dog charges after us. An accident at work puts financial stability just out of reach. The questionable choices of a doctor seem to make a loved one worse. A visit to an elderly relative in a nursing home reveals signs of abuse. These circumstances seem like fiction, or like the life of someone else, and when they happen to us it seems as if we have entered some kind of dream or deja vu.

But quick action is essential. The invisible web of law is woven to protect the individual in all of these cases and many more, but stipulates initiative and action.  In the same way that this election day is the chance to select a representative, an expert to work for us in ways that we could never do personally, when we find ourselves entangled in a legal issue we should seek the same type of expert. Most of us value democracy; far fewer work to become professional politicians. Most of us value justice; far fewer work to become professional attorneys.

If you are in need of legal representation, make that choice quickly and decisively. Trust and relate to your attorney as you do your political representatives – with respect and authority, but never forgetting who is working for whom.

If you are in need of legal representation, call VanDerGinst Law at 1-866-843-7367. The initial consultation is free of charge. If we agree to handle your injury case, we will work on a contingency fee basis, which means we get paid for our services only if, and when, there is a money recovery for you. In many cases a lawsuit must be filed before an applicable expiration date, known as a statute of limitations. So please call right away to ensure that you do not waive your right to possible compensation.